A love for V.C. Andrews

Twenty seven years ago, Andrew Neiderman took over the writing of the beloved books of V.C Andrews. Here are some interesting, facts and the reason to keep the books alive and present for this generation.

Lifetime airing five movies adapted from five V.C. Andrews titles! The first, Flowers in the Attic, breaks a viewing record at 6.1 million.

     V.C. Andrews is the longest, consistently published book franchise in American publishing history, now into its 35th year!

     Andrew Neiderman(author of The Devil’s Advocate)has carried the franchise for nearly 27 of those years. He is now the world’s most successful ghostwriter having moved the books from just under 30 million to over 106 million worldwide in 95 countries and 24 languages.

     Because of his success at reviving and prolonging the book franchise, other publishers have imitated the process by continuing such authors as Tom Clancy, Lawrence Sanders, and Raymond Chandler. In an increasingly changing book publishing world, ghostwriting successful authors has become a major factor in the market. Neiderman, as one of the original practitioners of this can best speak to the phenomenon. He has spoken on many talk shows and now with the tremendous Hollywood interest in the novels, has been interviewed by none less than NPR, Entertainment Weekly, and L.A. Buzz Feed, among many others.

     Heightening the interest for media in hosting an interview, is the upcoming publication, Christopher’s Diary, Secrets of Foxworth, the first of three novels to be born out of the worldwide successful Dollanganger series. It has already been sold throughout the UK and will be simultaneously published on October 28, 2014 in the UK, Australia, and India with a follow up in Poland.

     Neiderman, a former English teacher, can cover the topic from many angles. Under his own name, he has over 45 thrillers, a number produced as television and feature films, the most famous being The Devil’s Advocate with Al Pacino, Keanu Reeves and Charlize Theron, now in development as a stage musical in London and stage play in Holland.

Contact: Andrew Neiderman at 760-322-0889 or at Neid1@aol.com. Visit Neiderman.com.

 

Why V.C. Andrews Lives on

 

Witnessing the resurgence in the V.C. Andrews thirty-four-year-old book franchise, one has to wonder what it is about the titles, style, characters and stories that has made it so enduring despite the dramatic upheavals in the book publishing world, for there have been many. At the top of that list is the elimination of major retail book outlets that heavily featured mass market novels, such as Borders, as well as the surge in e-book sales that have had a devastating effect on brick and mortar stores everywhere.

     Yet, one fact remains, V.C. Andrews has outlasted competitors and strung a list of more than seventy titles, most of which that have found markets and sales internationally as well and continue to do so. There are a number of possible reasons for this phenomenon.

From Flowers in the Attic to the most recent, The Unwelcomed Child, V.C. Andrews novels have tapped into the psyche of young female characters who embody and express the fears, desires, and struggles involved with any child’s search for love and meaning in an increasingly dysfunctional environment. What was once thought to be practically fantasy (locking up your own children in an attic world for over three years) has proven today to be quite unexceptional. Indeed it seems as though reality is imitating fiction.

     V.C. Andrews was not the first to capture the confusion and complexity of family relationships, of course, but centering solely on the world of budding femininity and capturing the struggles in a style that borrowed from gothic, mystery, and romance and then churning them together in a new recipe to create a genre one could even call The V.C. Andrews genre, the novels found their own place to exist and flourish through decades now. Despite the changes in lifestyle from the late seventies to the second decade of the 21st Century, there was and is something universal, something untouched and undisturbed by whatever upheaval in social mores we’ve seen worldwide. The same question lives on…why do people who are supposed to love each other hurt each other so much and so deeply?

     In the course of answering the question, the V.C. Andrews novels created what has now been exploited as “New Adult” fiction, stories involving young people who have adult crises in their lives, whether it be a literal fight for survival or a relationship with someone older, someone forbidden.

     Indeed what has made V.C. Andrews so popular and attractive is that very word, “Forbidden.” The subject matter is usually not fodder for everyday dinner conversation, where that still exists, whether it is incest, The Dollanganger Series; a father who sells his own children, The Casteel series; or a father who casts his own daughter into the street to fend for herself, Forbidden Sister and Roxy’s Story. Others are writing about some of these subjects, but none have been able to duplicate the V.C. Andrews’ style described above, at least to the extent to be able to survive for now thirty-four years and going, for there are literally eight more titles in the pipeline.

     Pocket Books/Gallery, the publisher since the inception of the franchise, has adeptly managed the packaging of the new titles so as to give them a contemporary feel and yet maintain the style and flavor of what is special about V.C. Andrews novels. It is a challenge they embraced and continue to embrace with consistent new energy.

     Now this resurgence has finally caught the interest of Hollywood. Lifetime network’s embrace of the Dollanganger series has taken on the most difficult of all challenges perhaps, incest in a story involving young people. Perhaps its time has just come, but now other film entities are seriously considering the newer titles.

     Nothing shows the publisher’s awareness of the power of the V.C. Andrews phenomenon perhaps as much as the upcoming publications of Christopher’s Diary, Secrets of Foxworth, followed by Christopher’s Diary, Echoes of Dollanganger. The story, despite having four sequels and one prequel, has far more life and impact to deliver. Viewed through the eyes of a contemporary character, the diaries present a new prospective on the forbidden topic and with all the power and influence of modern mores, brings the followers of V.C. Andrews to a new place, born in their time and contemporary enough to challenge them to rethink what they will accept today.

     Alive and well, the V.C. Andrews novels, although ghostwritten for nearly twenty-seven years by novelist Andrew Neiderman(The Devil’s Advocate), are about to step on another stage and reawaken older titles thought sleeping on library shelves. It’s quite an exciting journey that has no end in sight.

……..

 

     Witnessing the resurgence in the V.C. Andrews thirty-four-year-old book franchise, one has to wonder what it is about the titles, style, characters and stories that has made it so enduring despite the dramatic upheavals in the book publishing world, for there have been many. At the top of that list is the elimination of major retail book outlets that heavily featured mass market novels, such as Borders, as well as the surge in e-book sales that have had a devastating effect on brick and mortar stores everywhere.

     Yet, one fact remains, V.C. Andrews has outlasted competitors and strung a list of more than seventy titles, most of which that have found markets and sales internationally as well and continue to do so. There are a number of possible reasons for this phenomenon.

From Flowers in the Attic to the most recent, The Unwelcomed Child, V.C. Andrews novels have tapped into the psyche of young female characters who embody and express the fears, desires, and struggles involved with any child’s search for love and meaning in an increasingly dysfunctional environment. What was once thought to be practically fantasy (locking up your own children in an attic world for over three years) has proven today to be quite unexceptional. Indeed it seems as though reality is imitating fiction.

     V.C. Andrews was not the first to capture the confusion and complexity of family relationships, of course, but centering solely on the world of budding femininity and capturing the struggles in a style that borrowed from gothic, mystery, and romance and then churning them together in a new recipe to create a genre one could even call The V.C. Andrews genre, the novels found their own place to exist and flourish through decades now. Despite the changes in lifestyle from the late seventies to the second decade of the 21st Century, there was and is something universal, something untouched and undisturbed by whatever upheaval in social mores we’ve seen worldwide. The same question lives on…why do people who are supposed to love each other hurt each other so much and so deeply?

     In the course of answering the question, the V.C. Andrews novels created what has now been exploited as “New Adult” fiction, stories involving young people who have adult crises in their lives, whether it be a literal fight for survival or a relationship with someone older, someone forbidden.

     Indeed what has made V.C. Andrews so popular and attractive is that very word, “Forbidden.” The subject matter is usually not fodder for everyday dinner conversation, where that still exists, whether it is incest, The Dollanganger Series; a father who sells his own children, The Casteel series; or a father who casts his own daughter into the street to fend for herself, Forbidden Sister and Roxy’s Story. Others are writing about some of these subjects, but none have been able to duplicate the V.C. Andrews’ style described above, at least to the extent to be able to survive for now thirty-four years and going, for there are literally eight more titles in the pipeline.

     Pocket Books/Gallery, the publisher since the inception of the franchise, has adeptly managed the packaging of the new titles so as to give them a contemporary feel and yet maintain the style and flavor of what is special about V.C. Andrews novels. It is a challenge they embraced and continue to embrace with consistent new energy.

     Now this resurgence has finally caught the interest of Hollywood. Lifetime network’s embrace of the Dollanganger series has taken on the most difficult of all challenges perhaps, incest in a story involving young people. Perhaps its time has just come, but now other film entities are seriously considering the newer titles.

     Nothing shows the publisher’s awareness of the power of the V.C. Andrews phenomenon perhaps as much as the upcoming publications of Christopher’s Diary, Secrets of Foxworth, followed by Christopher’s Diary, Echoes of Dollanganger. The story, despite having four sequels and one prequel, has far more life and impact to deliver. Viewed through the eyes of a contemporary character, the diaries present a new prospective on the forbidden topic and with all the power and influence of modern mores, brings the followers of V.C. Andrews to a new place, born in their time and contemporary enough to challenge them to rethink what they will accept today.

     Alive and well, the V.C. Andrews novels, although ghostwritten for nearly twenty-seven years by novelist Andrew Neiderman(The Devil’s Advocate), are about to step on another stage and reawaken older titles thought sleeping on library shelves. It’s quite an exciting journey that has no end in sight.

……..

 

 

     Witnessing the resurgence in the V.C. Andrews thirty-four-year-old book franchise, one has to wonder what it is about the titles, style, characters and stories that has made it so enduring despite the dramatic upheavals in the book publishing world, for there have been many. At the top of that list is the elimination of major retail book outlets that heavily featured mass market novels, such as Borders, as well as the surge in e-book sales that have had a devastating effect on brick and mortar stores everywhere.

     Yet, one fact remains, V.C. Andrews has outlasted competitors and strung a list of more than seventy titles, most of which that have found markets and sales internationally as well and continue to do so. There are a number of possible reasons for this phenomenon.

From Flowers in the Attic to the most recent, The Unwelcomed Child, V.C. Andrews novels have tapped into the psyche of young female characters who embody and express the fears, desires, and struggles involved with any child’s search for love and meaning in an increasingly dysfunctional environment. What was once thought to be practically fantasy (locking up your own children in an attic world for over three years) has proven today to be quite unexceptional. Indeed it seems as though reality is imitating fiction.

     V.C. Andrews was not the first to capture the confusion and complexity of family relationships, of course, but centering solely on the world of budding femininity and capturing the struggles in a style that borrowed from gothic, mystery, and romance and then churning them together in a new recipe to create a genre one could even call The V.C. Andrews genre, the novels found their own place to exist and flourish through decades now. Despite the changes in lifestyle from the late seventies to the second decade of the 21st Century, there was and is something universal, something untouched and undisturbed by whatever upheaval in social mores we’ve seen worldwide. The same question lives on…why do people who are supposed to love each other hurt each other so much and so deeply?

     In the course of answering the question, the V.C. Andrews novels created what has now been exploited as “New Adult” fiction, stories involving young people who have adult crises in their lives, whether it be a literal fight for survival or a relationship with someone older, someone forbidden.

     Indeed what has made V.C. Andrews so popular and attractive is that very word, “Forbidden.” The subject matter is usually not fodder for everyday dinner conversation, where that still exists, whether it is incest, The Dollanganger Series; a father who sells his own children, The Casteel series; or a father who casts his own daughter into the street to fend for herself, Forbidden Sister and Roxy’s Story. Others are writing about some of these subjects, but none have been able to duplicate the V.C. Andrews’ style described above, at least to the extent to be able to survive for now thirty-four years and going, for there are literally eight more titles in the pipeline.

     Pocket Books/Gallery, the publisher since the inception of the franchise, has adeptly managed the packaging of the new titles so as to give them a contemporary feel and yet maintain the style and flavor of what is special about V.C. Andrews novels. It is a challenge they embraced and continue to embrace with consistent new energy.

     Now this resurgence has finally caught the interest of Hollywood. Lifetime network’s embrace of the Dollanganger series has taken on the most difficult of all challenges perhaps, incest in a story involving young people. Perhaps its time has just come, but now other film entities are seriously considering the newer titles.

     Nothing shows the publisher’s awareness of the power of the V.C. Andrews phenomenon perhaps as much as the upcoming publications of Christopher’s Diary, Secrets of Foxworth, followed by Christopher’s Diary, Echoes of Dollanganger. The story, despite having four sequels and one prequel, has far more life and impact to deliver. Viewed through the eyes of a contemporary character, the diaries present a new prospective on the forbidden topic and with all the power and influence of modern mores, brings the followers of V.C. Andrews to a new place, born in their time and contemporary enough to challenge them to rethink what they will accept today.

     Alive and well, the V.C. Andrews novels, although ghostwritten for nearly twenty-seven years by novelist Andrew Neiderman(The Devil’s Advocate), are about to step on another stage and reawaken older titles thought sleeping on library shelves. It’s quite an exciting journey that has no end in sight.

 

 

     Witnessing the resurgence in the V.C. Andrews thirty-four-year-old book franchise, one has to wonder what it is about the titles, style, characters and stories that has made it so enduring despite the dramatic upheavals in the book publishing world, for there have been many. At the top of that list is the elimination of major retail book outlets that heavily featured mass market novels, such as Borders, as well as the surge in e-book sales that have had a devastating effect on brick and mortar stores everywhere.

     Yet, one fact remains, V.C. Andrews has outlasted competitors and strung a list of more than seventy titles, most of which that have found markets and sales internationally as well and continue to do so. There are a number of possible reasons for this phenomenon.

From Flowers in the Attic to the most recent, The Unwelcomed Child, V.C. Andrews novels have tapped into the psyche of young female characters who embody and express the fears, desires, and struggles involved with any child’s search for love and meaning in an increasingly dysfunctional environment. What was once thought to be practically fantasy (locking up your own children in an attic world for over three years) has proven today to be quite unexceptional. Indeed it seems as though reality is imitating fiction.

     V.C. Andrews was not the first to capture the confusion and complexity of family relationships, of course, but centering solely on the world of budding femininity and capturing the struggles in a style that borrowed from gothic, mystery, and romance and then churning them together in a new recipe to create a genre one could even call The V.C. Andrews genre, the novels found their own place to exist and flourish through decades now. Despite the changes in lifestyle from the late seventies to the second decade of the 21st Century, there was and is something universal, something untouched and undisturbed by whatever upheaval in social mores we’ve seen worldwide. The same question lives on…why do people who are supposed to love each other hurt each other so much and so deeply?

     In the course of answering the question, the V.C. Andrews novels created what has now been exploited as “New Adult” fiction, stories involving young people who have adult crises in their lives, whether it be a literal fight for survival or a relationship with someone older, someone forbidden.

     Indeed what has made V.C. Andrews so popular and attractive is that very word, “Forbidden.” The subject matter is usually not fodder for everyday dinner conversation, where that still exists, whether it is incest, The Dollanganger Series; a father who sells his own children, The Casteel series; or a father who casts his own daughter into the street to fend for herself, Forbidden Sister and Roxy’s Story. Others are writing about some of these subjects, but none have been able to duplicate the V.C. Andrews’ style described above, at least to the extent to be able to survive for now thirty-four years and going, for there are literally eight more titles in the pipeline.

     Pocket Books/Gallery, the publisher since the inception of the franchise, has adeptly managed the packaging of the new titles so as to give them a contemporary feel and yet maintain the style and flavor of what is special about V.C. Andrews novels. It is a challenge they embraced and continue to embrace with consistent new energy.

     Now this resurgence has finally caught the interest of Hollywood. Lifetime network’s embrace of the Dollanganger series has taken on the most difficult of all challenges perhaps, incest in a story involving young people. Perhaps its time has just come, but now other film entities are seriously considering the newer titles.

     Nothing shows the publisher’s awareness of the power of the V.C. Andrews phenomenon perhaps as much as the upcoming publications of Christopher’s Diary, Secrets of Foxworth, followed by Christopher’s Diary, Echoes of Dollanganger. The story, despite having four sequels and one prequel, has far more life and impact to deliver. Viewed through the eyes of a contemporary character, the diaries present a new prospective on the forbidden topic and with all the power and influence of modern mores, brings the followers of V.C. Andrews to a new place, born in their time and contemporary enough to challenge them to rethink what they will accept today.

     Alive and well, the V.C. Andrews novels, although ghostwritten for nearly twenty-seven years by novelist Andrew Neiderman(The Devil’s Advocate), are about to step on another stage and reawaken older titles thought sleeping on library shelves. It’s quite an exciting journey that has no end in sight.

Why Did I Write Christopher’s Diary?

 

By Andrew Neiderman

 

 

After writing V.C. Andrews novels now for over 27 years and developing a Facebook page for the fans that Facebook itself called the 7th most explosive in terms of its growth, I realized that www.

 

Flowers in the Attic and indeed the entire Dollanganger series has been and continues to be a phenomenon in the publishing world. If any title deserved a retrospect and revisit, it was surely this one.

 

But it was important not to simply retell the story developed in Flowers in the Attic. Christopher’s Diary does give another prospective to the events. Christopher, as a character, has been seen only through Cathy’s eyes, and basically she assumes and interprets as would anyone, through her own perspective and subjective feelings about what’s happening to them throughout the series. Virginia Andrews did a wonderful job of fleshing out Cathy’s character and although limited obviously by her point of view, Christopher’s and Corrine’s characters especially.

 

It was time to delve deeper into Christopher’s motivations. He is, we quickly see, an extraordinarily intelligent boy, far more mature than most his age. Like any child, he is not objective about his parents, but in Christopher’s Diary we see that he can be when it is necessary to be. His disappointments in his father and his mother become clearer and understandable for us. Most important, perhaps, we see more motivation for why and how he put up with his mother’s obvious lies. He battles the child in himself constantly, the urge to be optimistic and naïve, and eventually he faces the truths about his parents and most importantly, about himself.

 

What a wonder all this can be when it is brought together with some of the mysteries not really solved in the Dollanganger series. Christopher’s Diary provides that.

 

The second major reason for the novel is to develop the A-story, the story of the high school senior girl whose father while evaluating the ruins of Foxworth Hall discovers the diary. Couched now in what would be closer to reality if such an event as depicted in Flowers in the Attic really happened, Christopher’s Diary is full of discoveries for any reader. What the novel examines and personifies through the main character, Kristin Masterwood, is how readers through the decades reacted to reading Flowers in the Attic. The way the diary affects her is the way the novel affected the millions of readers who experienced it. There will be a great deal of understanding and the resurrection of feelings that were experienced.

 

Christopher’s Diary reinforces therefore why Flowers in the Attic is a publishing phenomenon and will help it live on for decades to come.

 

 

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